On Creating Weekly

Hello

If you’ve been following me on Instagram, you’ll know that I have been doing a weekly project where I have been creating one watercolour piece a week for 2017. It’s week 40 this week, and so I thought I’d share a bit about my project with you.

After completing my 366 days of quotes project last year, I knew I wanted to do something this year, but just not as intensive as a daily project. I thought about skills I wanted to hone, and decided that a watercolour project would be perfect. Watercolours are easy to use, they don’t smell bad, clean up is quick and painless and the paper and paint is relatively cheap (well, as cheap as art supplies get. Emphasis on the relative part). And so I set out to paint 52 paintings by the end of the year.

There are many perks of doing a weekly project. It’s a wonderful way to force yourself to carve time out each week to create, and my weekly paint and paper sessions are highly therapeutic and rewarding. It can suck slightly when you feel as if you run out of ideas and feel as if you don’t have much time. The best advice I can give you is to push on, and not be too hard on yourself. After all, it is supposed to be enjoyable and not feel like some kind of creative torture.

So if you feel as if you could use some practice in a new skill, or you just want to create some intentional time to create, try a weekly or daily project. You’ll be surprised at how much you’ll improve and how innovative it’ll make you!

Here are some of my favourite pieces from my project so far.

You can see all of my paintings on Instagram, under the tag #52weeksofwatercolour.
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Nabeela x

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A Note on Self-DoubtΒ 

I recently did some content creation for a local small business and was thrilled about being asked because it was the first time I created content from scratch.Nonetheless, after emailing off the first batch of samples, a terrible bout of self-doubt set in. 

At first, I was happy but when I looked at them later that day, I felt uneasy about them. 

A million questions were running through my head. “What if they hate the colours? What if it isn’t what they wanted? What if they hate it so much that they decide they don’t want to work with me anymore?” I started knit-picking at my work, noticing everything that could be a possible flaw. 

When I got an email back the next day saying that they loved what I had done, I felt euphoric and mostly, relieved.

I carried on with the project and the outcome was lovely. 

It got me thinking. We doubt ourselves so much. We have little confidence in ourselves but expect others to.

The process of creation should be freeing and liberating, not restricting and upsetting.

It’s time we put a little more trust into our creative process and stop overthinking it all. 

Nabeela x